New York City is a big place filled with an overwhelming amount of neighborhoods. Even when you're just searching in Manhattan, it can be overwhelming to navigate the endless streets and choose a place to live.

If you set your sights on living in Manhattan, you'll have to choose which of the 20+ neighborhoods to live in. Follow our guide of neighborhoods from downtown to uptown to find out which neighborhood is best for you.

map of manhattan neighborhoods
Illustration by Courtney Sabo for Kopa

Battery Park City

Sky scrapers in Battery Park City
Photo credit: Daniel Polevoy

Overview

Located on the southwest tip of Lower Manhattan, Battery Park City is a planned neighborhood filled with upscale apartments and condos that overlook the Hudson River. Along with its residential buildings, this neighborhood has plenty of parks and an esplanade that runs along the Hudson. The neighborhood quiets down early, perhaps due to the large number of families living here. With its quiet — some may say too quiet — feel, it's been rated the best neighborhood in NYC to raise a family. There isn't a subway station in this neighborhood, so residents catch the subway in the Financial District.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,300

2-bedroom: $5,200

3-bedroom: $8,800

Notable attractions

Tribeca

Cobblestone road in Tribeca
Photo credit: Zachary Shakked

Overview

The Triangle Below Canal, known as Tribeca, is filled with new money, exquisite lofts, and trendy bars and restaurants. Quite a few celebrities live here, and the nightlife is refined and cosmopolitan. Despite its residents' high incomes, the area doesn't feel stuffy and old but rather relaxed and chic. Depending on who you ask, Tribeca either feels down to earth with its calm evenings and streets or pretentious and trying too hard. The area still has a number of cobblestone streets, industrial buildings, and pre-civil war buildings, but those are now mixing in with modern buildings.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $4,300

2-bedroom: $8,200

3-bedroom: $12,900

Notable attractions

  • Brandy Library: upscale yet laid-back cocktail bar
  • Poets House: poetry library and literary center where you can listen to readings

Financial District

Sky scrapers in Financial District NYC
Photo credit: Henning Klokkeråsen

Overview

Located at the tip of Manhattan, FiDi was the first neighborhood in the city. It has outgrown its humble beginnings and is now filled with skyscrapers, museums, and historic sites. During the day, the buildings are filled with workers, and the streets are packed with tourists taking a look at the New York Stock Exchange, Federal Reserve Building, and other iconic financial sites. When night hits, things quiet down; there isn't much entertainment outside of the picturesque pedestrian-only Stone Street.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,400

2-bedroom: $4,900

3-bedroom: $6,400

Notable attractions

Chinatown

Downtown Chinatown NYC
Photo credit: Amanda Dalbjörn

Overview

As the largest "Chinatown" in the US, this neighborhood is packed with dim sum restaurants, street vendors, and colorful awnings and signs. While you'll hear Cantonese and Mandarin in the streets, walk past tea shops, and see seemingly endless shops selling vegetables and fish, the area is changing. Recent development and rising rents have forced new immigrants to settle elsewhere and removed some of the area’s working-class vibes. Chinatown now combines low-rise buildings, walk-ups, and newly constructed high-rises, so rent prices vary.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,300

2-bedroom: $3,000

3-bedroom: $4,000

Notable attractions

Little Italy

Welcome to Little Italy Sign NYC
Photo credit: Alex Haney

Overview

While Little Italy still includes Italian bakeries and restaurants, it is less Italian today than it was in the past. Due to rising rents, the area has shrunk over time and now covers about three blocks. Much of the neighborhood now caters to tourists looking for a piece (or bite) of Italy. That said, you can still find some great cannoli, mozzarella, espresso, and pasta. The area has narrow streets and lots of red-and-white checkered tablecloths, creating an old-world feel. Many restaurants still maintain a warm and welcoming atmosphere, and there's plenty of Italian pride.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,000

2-bedroom: $4,150

3-bedroom: $5,500

Notable attractions

  • Benito One: a family-oriented restaurant operating since 1698
  • Feast of San Gennaro: a 10-day street fair held in September including food demonstrations and live music

Nolita

Nolita storefronts
Photo credit: IK's World Trip

Overview

Nolita, for North of Little Italy, is a cozy and charming neighborhood. While life here may seem simple, it's not because the place is boring, but rather because it's a collection of inviting cafes, trendy-yet-friendly boutiques, and bars that are easy to spend a night in. The scenery is beautiful with cobblestone streets, and its patio dining offers great people watching. The area is lively during the day and night, but isn't as commercial as some other neighborhoods.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,400

2-bedroom: $4,000

3-bedroom: $6,700

Notable attractions

  • Chef's Club: a pop-up restaurant space that hosts chefs from across the country
  • Warm: a thoughtfully-curated boutique selling clothes, jewelry, and home goods
  • Rice to Riches: a shop serving only rice pudding with funky names like "It Takes Two to Peach Mango" and "Fluent in French Toast."
  • Cafe Habana: Cuban-Mexican eats with awesome Cuban sandwiches and Mexican street corn

SoHo

Apartment buildings in SoHo
Photo credit: imke.sta

Overview

Once known for its small art galleries, SoHo (meaning "South of Houston") still retains some of its artistic feel. However, the area feels more luxurious than previously, and the area's prices have risen. It's easy to spend a day wandering SoHo's streets, looking at the cast-iron buildings, checking out the fashion of fellow pedestrians, and popping in a few of its boutiques and cafes. When you're done shopping or people-watching at the end of the day, you can turn to a dive bar, upscale cocktail lounge, or casual pub.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,600

2-bedroom: $5,200

3-bedroom: $6,500

Notable attractions

  • Artists and Fleas: a marketplace features 30+ rotating artists, curators, and more
  • Shuka: a fun Eastern Mediterranean restaurant
  • The Drawing Center: a museum and nonprofit exhibition space focused on drawings

Lower East Side

Lower East Side apartment buildings
Photo credit: kl801

Overview

Located across the East River from Brooklyn, the Lower East Side mixes gritty pieces of the past with new high-rise apartments and hip cocktail bars. You'll be able to find all kinds of cuisine, plenty of nightlife, and a lively and welcoming atmosphere. People out and about just want to have a good time, but with this comes noise. Along with bars and clubs, there are boutiques and art galleries throughout the neighborhood, which you can browse during the quiet daytime.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,800

2-bedroom: $3,650

3-bedroom: $5,100

Notable attractions

Greenwich Village/West Village

Greenwich village looking at One World Trade Center
Photo credit: Nicolas Vollmer

Overview

In the past, The Village was where bohemians, beatniks, and gay rights activists congregated. Today, it's a bit more mainstream, but you'll still find plenty of independently-owned boutiques, eclectic shops, well-dressed friends eating brunch together, and residents that embrace just about everything. The streets are always busy, but they lack they stereotypical NYC hustle and bustle. There's a strong feeling of community that is enhanced by the beautiful brownstones, co-op buildings, and sidewalk cafes. Don't forget to walk down Perry Street to see Carrie Bradshaw's apartment from "Sex and the City." (Note: The house does have current homeowners, and they don't like people constantly photographing their house.)

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,200

2-bedroom: $4,050

3-bedroom: $6,300

Notable attractions

  • The Stonewall Inn: the gay bar that was the site of the 1969 riots that lead to the gay rights movement
  • Washington Square Park: green space with some of Manhattan's best people-watching
  • Comedy Cellar: intimate and famous comedy venue that has featured many well-known comedians, including Jon Stewart, Louis C.K., and Dave Chappelle

Bowery

Bowery apartment buildings
Photo credit: John Mason

Overview

While residents usually don't describe this neighborhood as "quaint" due to its lack of trees and refined charm, Bowery has lots of great restaurants and shops, paired with a mix of trendy and gritty vibes. You can find remnants of its drug history with sights like Mars Bar, which closed down in 2011. In the past few decades, modern hotels, and multi-million dollar penthouses have risen in Bowery, and more and more young professionals are flocking to the area.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,100

2-bedroom: $3,100

3-bedroom: $5,000

Notable attractions

  • New Museum: an art museum in a seven-story building that was founded to enable local artists to display their work
  • [Bowery Electric](Bowery Electric): rock music venue with live music every night and different rooms with different vibes, along with a hard-to-miss neon blue sign.

Alphabet City

Alphabet city apartment buildings caught in a blizzard
Photo credit: Salim Virji

Overview

Alphabet City has attracted bohemian folks like eccentric musicians, artists, and poets for years. The neighborhood used to be one of the most dangerous, high-crime areas in town. Alphabet City is much safer now, but the area hasn't lost its gritty, offbeat feel that makes it unique. The neighborhood's name comes from the avenues it overlaps — A, B, C, and D, the only single-letter avenues in Manhattan. Because of zoning laws, you'll find lots of prewar walk-up tenement buildings, with a portion under rent control, which attracts middle-income residents. In recent years, residents are seeing development of larger, modern apartment buildings in Alphabet City.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,300

2-bedroom: $3,500

3-bedroom: $5,000

Notable attractions

NoHo

NoHo buildings toward Best Buy
Photo credit: Vincent Desjardins

Overview

This upper-class neighborhood is located between the East and West Village, North of Houston Street. (That's where "NoHo" comes from). While the neighborhood covers a small area, it packs a lot into a limited space. The area tends to be less crowded than the nearby villages and SoHo, yet it's close to the action of Midtown. However, you don't have to leave the neighborhood to find entertainment. There are refined lounges, hip coffee shops, and inventive theaters. This is definitely an upper-class area, but it maintains a creative, relaxed, and no-frills feel.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,400

2-bedroom: $6,000

3-bedroom: $8,500

Notable attractions

East Village

East Village face mural
Photo credit: Shannon McNay

Overview

Located east of the Bowery in Lower Manhattan, the East Village has a rich history of attracting Beatniks, writers, artists, and punks. While some of this grittiness still remains, upscale cocktail lounges now mix in with cheap dive bars. You'll find lots of college students and recent grads — some who want to spend the majority of their free time hitting the bars. But, like any NYC neighborhood, you'll find people of all ages, as well as restaurants representing a variety of cultures. It's worth noting that some parts of the neighborhood have limited subway access and nights can be noisy.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,800

2-bedroom: $3,600

3-bedroom: $5,000

Notable attractions

The Meatpacking District

Meatpacking district new tech company buildings
Photo credit: Phil Roeder

Overview

Want posh and glamorous? Then head to The Meatpacking District. While this neighborhood used to be filled with slaughterhouses and meatpacking plants, these buildings now host fancy clubs, high-end restaurants, hotels, salons, and boutiques. The area has a new feel due to its inventive and trendsetting businesses, but the past remains in the form of cobblestone streets and old brick exteriors. As you might expect, this area has a bit of a try-hard, exclusive attitude as well as expensive prices. It also attracts lots of tourists as well as groups looking for a special night out.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $4,100

2-bedroom: $5,100

3-bedroom: $6,400

Notable attractions

Union Square

Union square cherry blossom trees
Photo credit: Eden, Janine and Jim

Overview

Drawing its name from the local pedestrian plaza, Union Square is bustling with pedestrians, street vendors hawking wares, professionals on lunch break, protestors, and buskers. The small neighborhood is set in the middle of it all and acts as a sort of convergence point for area neighborhoods. Along with Union Square Park, you'll find big-name stores and quick-stop restaurants. The area's character isn't in the shops and buildings that line its streets but rather the myriad of people you're able to spot and talk to while hanging out in the neighborhood.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $4,400

2-bedroom: $5,100

3-bedroom: $7,200

Notable attractions

Gramercy

Gramercy tulips and cherry blossom trees
Photo credit: Eden, Janine and Jim

Overview

It's no surprise this area attracts well-to-do families with its quiet, tree-lined streets, gorgeous architecture, and close proximity to Midtown. Strolling down the streets is a pleasant experience, and you'll see plenty of doorman buildings, magnificent brownstones, and manicured yet cozy gardens. Don't try to enter Gramercy Park; only residents that live in adjacent buildings have a key to access it. While the area may sound uptight, it actually sports a community-oriented, small-town feel. Residents head to bed early, so don't look for lively nightlife in Gramercy.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,100

2-bedroom: $4,100

3-bedroom: $5,200

Notable attractions

Flatiron District

Flatiron district triangular building
Photo credit: Jermaine Ee

Overview

This neighborhood is located just south of Midtown and Union Square, allowing for quick access to much of the city. Along 5th Avenue, you can shop 'til you drop at stores like Cole Haan, Anthropologie, and LuluLemon, all of which have their largest stores here. The area is bustling during the day as professionals head to their jobs and equally busy in the evening as people head to eat at one of the many great restaurants or hang out in Madison Square Park. The scene is more refined than other parts of the city, so don't expect crazy, loud nightlife. The buildings are exquisite and include the wedge-shaped Flatiron building and walk-ups with preserved historic details.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $4,300

2-bedroom: $7,000

3-bedroom: $9,200

Notable attractions

  • Eataly: an Italian market filled with all the burrata, olive oil, and soppressata you could ever want
  • The Lego Store: a place to let your inner child go wild and see amazing builds
  • Dough: handmade artisanal donuts, with flavors from hibiscus to toasted coconut to simple glazed

Chelsea

Chelsea park and flowers overlooking new buildings
Photo credit: Iker Alonso

Overview

Chelsea manages to combine a posh, sophisticated, and artistic character without feeling too pretentious. Take a walk on its streets, and you'll notice old brownstones mixed with new luxury apartment buildings and lots of art. It's a prime place for exploring new ideas, whether that's the latest cocktail creation or a painting in one of many experimental art galleries. Due to its proximity to Midtown, happening nightlife, and increasing entertainment options, Chelsea is a popular place for young people to live. The neighborhood is also home to a large gay population and the bars they support.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,400

2-bedroom: $5,000

3-bedroom: $6,400

Notable attractions

  • The High Line: once a railway, an iconic 1.45-mile-long greenway featuring gardens, performances, and visual art
  • Babycastles: a collective space where you can view and play art-focused video games
  • Chelsea Market: food and shopping mall with dozens of vendors where you can grab something to eat or load up on high-quality groceries

Kips Bay

Kips bay apartment buildings at E 27 St
Photo credit: Eden, Janine and Jim

Overview

Located on the East River not far from Midtown, Kips Bay is a relaxed neighborhood with easy access to neighborhoods including Chelsea and the East Village. The eastern side of the area, closer to the East River, tends to be quiet and relatively peaceful. As you head further west near 3rd Ave, you'll encounter more bars and restaurants and therefore more action and noise. It's a safe and welcoming place, but many New Yorkers say it doesn't have a whole lot of character. There's a number of hospitals along the river, so it's common for medical professionals to live here.

Average rent prices

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,600

2-bedroom: $4,000

3-bedroom: $5,200

Notable attractions

Murray Hill

Murray Hill cherry blossom trees in front of MetLife building
Photo credit: taigatrommelchen

Overview

Sandwiched between Midtown and the East River, Murray Hill provides a convenient location, older buildings with beautiful architecture, and a welcoming and relaxed vibe. While there’s an active nightlife scene here, the vibe is down-to-earth during both the day and night. Lots of young people live in townhomes and apartment buildings in the area, and there are also tall office towers and small bars and restaurants. The block of Lexington Ave between 27th and 28th street is known as Curry Hill after its large number of Indian and Southeast Asian restaurants.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,200

2-bedroom: $3,400

3-bedroom: $5,200

Notable attractions

  • Scandinavia House: leading center for Nordic culture in the United States, where you can learn all about the art and culture of Scandinavia
  • AKC Museum of the Dog: everything you need to know about man's best friend
  • Sons of Thunder: restaurant serving up casual Hawaiian food

Koreatown

Koreatown bright signs at night
Photo credit: Paul Wasneski

Overview

Located near Midtown, the tiny Koreatown is jam-packed with karaoke bars, spas, and food. People come here for the fried chicken, raw fish, sweet pastries, and barbeque. Unsurprisingly, the area is filled with Korean-owned businesses, and there's lots of Korean culture around. Like in Seoul, but unlike in the rest of Manhattan, storefronts are stacked on top of each other. So when you're visiting the area, don't forget to look up! Most signs are bilingual and lots of restaurants here are open 24/7. Since the area is so small, there's not much residential space.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,100

2-bedroom: $4,650

3-bedroom: $6,100

Notable attractions

Hell's Kitchen

Hells Kitchen writing on building
Photo credit: hercigonja

Overview

Located between Midtown and the Hudson, Hell's Kitchen is filled with inventive restaurants, bars, clubs, and the tourists wandering over from Midtown. Due to its businesses, the streets are crowded and often noisy. This is the place to go if you're looking for lots to do but not necessarily a place where you'll find a community-oriented feel. The main subway stations for this area are Times Square and Port Authority, so prepare to battle some pedestrian traffic when hopping on the train.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,500

2-bedroom: $3,750

3-bedroom: $5,500

Notable attractions

Hudson Yards

The Vessel at Hudson Yards
Photo credit: Courtney Sabo

Overview

Some New Yorkers are calling this new neighborhood "The New Wall Street" due to many Wall Street offices moving here from Midtown. Many tourists flock to this commercial, futuristic, and luxurious area to see and walk around the Vessel. Here, you'll also find an Equinox hotel, immaculate subway station, a seven-story, 720,000-square-foot shopping mall, and high-rise apartment buildings that attract those who work in the Hudson Bay skyscrapers.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,100

2-bedroom: $5,000

3-bedroom: $7,500

Notable attractions

  • Vessel: honey-comb architectural structure with 154 interconnecting flights of stairs and almost 2,500 individual steps
  • Electric Lemon: polished restaurant in Equinox hotel with veggie-forward dishes

Midtown

Flowers signs and cabs in Midtown
Photo credit: Julius Jansson

Overview

When tourists think of Manhattan, they often think of Midtown Manhattan. This busy neighborhood is filled with attractions including Times Square, the Empire State Building, Radio City Music Hall, and the Rockefeller Center. The sidewalks are packed with tourists, taxis honk endlessly in the street, and billboards flash bright lights. With that said, this isn't a place where you'll run out of things to do. You can browse fabric shops in the Garment District, shop until you drop, and people watch all day. Some people refer to this area as Midtown East to distinguish it from the Theater District.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,000

2-bedroom: $4,500

3-bedroom: $5,250

Notable attractions

  • St. Patrick's Cathedral: a church with magnificent architecture and history
  • Museum of Modern Art: contemporary museum that includes works by artists including Warhol and Van Gough
  • Nintendo NY: flagship specialty store of Nintendo, where you can play some demo games and shop all things Nintendo

Sutton Place

Sutton Place office buildings
Photo credit: Patrick Nouhailler

Overview

A well-kept and upscale neighborhood, Sutton Place remains largely invisible to those who don't live there, even though it's not far from Midtown Manhattan. It's mostly residential, and residents live in stately preserved brownstones and pre-war townhouses. There are a few restaurants and shops here, but it's largely a place where it's residents live quietly, out of view of the rest of the city. The east side of the neighborhood overlooks the East River, and there are a number of parks where you can sit and watch the water go by.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,850

2-bedroom: $4,500

3-bedroom: $5,800

Notable attractions

  • Sutton Place Park: outdoor space with splendid views of the East River and Brooklyn
  • Bistro Vendôme: French restaurant with an outdoor terrace and airy, upscale vibes

Columbus Circle

Columbus circle roundabout, park, and statue
Photo credit: Maria Eklind

Overview

Columbus Circle is located in an extremely convenient location—it's near lots of subways, Central Park, office buildings. Since it's located on the north edge of Hell's Kitchen, you can find plenty of restaurants and bars in walking distance. Columbus Circle is quite luxurious with plenty of upscale apartment buildings, 5-star hotels, and glamorous lounges. While the day is bustling with people, nightlife is hard to find around here.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $4,650

2-bedroom: $7,100

3-bedroom: $12,100

Notable attractions

Upper West Side

Expensive home in Upper West Side
Photo credit: tweber1

Overview

Located the area west of Central Park, the Upper West Side has appeared in shows including Seinfeld and 30 Rock. It's no surprise; the picturesque, tree-lined residential streets lend themself well to the camera. The scenery and residents make this neighborhood feel cozy and relaxed, yet there's plenty of entertainment options including a plethora of low-key bars and intellectual and artistic options like the American Museum of Natural History. Housing options include condos, brownstone apartments, affordable walk-ups, and newer high-rise buildings.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $3,300

2-bedroom: $4,900

3-bedroom: $5,800

Notable attractions

  • Barney Greengrass: cash-only Jewish deli, known for its smoked fish
  • Beacon Theatre: a luxurious theater that hosts big-name acts, including Queen concerts during their "A Night at the Opera Tour" (1976)
  • Ballet Hispánico: dance school exploring Latin cultures through dance training and performances

Upper East Side

New buildings at Broadway in Upper East Side
Photo credit: svetiq

Overview

Located to the east of Central Park, the Upper East Side was once home to wealthy families including the Rockefellers and Kennedys. While the area is sometimes known for its sophisticated (and sometimes snobby) residents and boarding schools near Madison and Park Avenue, this neighborhood has a diverse mix of residents and feels a bit like a quiet, tree-lined suburb at times. You'll find tourists visiting Museum Mile, working families living on the western side of the neighborhood, and dining options to fit all tastes and budgets. While it's a bit far from Lower Manhattan, it has just about everything you need.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,400

2-bedroom: $3,500

3-bedroom: $5,000

Notable attractions

Harlem

Park and tower peaking out from Harlem
Photo credit: Allie

Overview

Known for its longstanding African American culture, Harlem's streets were once lined with jazz clubs, soul food restaurants, and Gospel churches. You'll still find some of these here, but gentrification, changing demographics, and decreasing crime have propelled renovations of apartment buildings and led to the opening of coffee shops and big-brand stores. The area is filled with affordable brownstones as well as newly-built luxury apartments.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,100

2-bedroom: $2,700

3-bedroom: $3,600

Notable attractions

  • Melba's: soul food heaven, known for its fried chicken and waffles
  • Apollo Theater: iconic music hall with an amateur night
  • Minton's: jazz club and bar with small bites

East Harlem

East Harlem sunset
Photo Credit: Peter M.

Overview

Also known as Spanish Harlem or El Barrio, this Upper Manhattan neighborhood lies east of Fifth Avenue. East Harlem has a large Hispanic population, and the area is peppered with restaurants, shops, and art inspired by Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean. The neighborhood has one of the highest concentrations of public housing in the city, and there's also a strong sense of community throughout the area. While some parts of the neighborhood have higher crime rates than most areas in Manhattan, there are plenty of safe areas where you can find nice apartments with low rent.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $2,200

2-bedroom: $2,800

3-bedroom: $3,800

Notable attractions

Washington Heights/Hudson Heights

View of the bridge from Washington Heights
Photo credit: Allie

Overview

Tucked away in Uptown, this residential neighborhood is filled with affordable stores, winding streets, and the steepest hills in Manhattan. The area has a relaxed vibe and a slower pace than much of Manhattan. Hudson Heights has a few restaurants and bars clustered around 187th Street, and you'll find more places to eat and drink in lower Washington Heights. However, the neighborhood's strengths lie in the plethora of green spaces, parks, and proximity to the Hudson. Lots of families and older folks live in the area, and while people are friendly, they generally keep to themselves.

Average monthly rent

Studio / 1-bedroom: $1,900

2-bedroom: $2,500

3-bedroom: $3,000

Notable attractions

Fort Tryon Park: a peaceful park with Manhattan's largest dog run and the Cloisters

Little Red Lighthouse: the only remaining lighthouse in Manhattan